Saint Patrick’s Day: A Poem

March 17, 2015 at 7:37 pm (History, Poetry) (, , , , )

Saint Patrick’s Day: A Poem

On the shores of Galilee a certain Carpenter did teach
oh how to Tara’s golden halls would that message reach
A lad was in his 16th year when into pirating hands he fell
and carried across the Irish Sea to an Emerald Isle to dwell
sold as a slave to the chieftan Milchu
so what did this young lad do?
For six years in County Antrim he tended his master’s flocks in the Valley of the Braid
this boy becoming a man who was captured in a raid
After six years he fled his cruel master and bent his steps towards the west
His journey of 200 miles was really quite the test
At Killala Bay he set sail towards the land of his birth
but as a future Bard once wrote, “There are more things in heaven and earth…”
A new master did young Patrick find
a sweet master so Divine
A new master who said, “Make the Irish mine”.
So the new flocks he would tend
those whose broken hearts he’d mend
were the same people who had taken him captive
a people he set free by saying “Believe in Jesus and live.”
And now every March 17th, Irish hearts are filled with mirth
toasting a lad whose Master arrived in a stable at birth.
And while in Tara’s halls an earthly harp is mute with its soul of music shed
an heavenly choir sings of He whose heart, hands, head and feet had Bled
a loving Master who called Patrick to the test
and through Patrick’s voice and Patrick’s hands caused the Irish to join His people blest.

-A poem written by Christopher
on Saint Patrick’s Day
Tuesday March 17th
2015.

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