Ode To Classical Music: A Poem

July 11, 2016 at 4:23 pm (Commentary, Culture, Music, Poetry) (, , , , , , )

Ode To Classical Music: A Poem

With my cable TV subscription cancelled
and listening to the Baroque Music Channel now gone
I’ve been forced to turn to the radio
and more specifically CBC Radio 2
and the French language Radio-Canada to listen to music that relaxes and calms my soul
CBC Radio 2 and Radio-Canada play a great deal of Classical music and Jazz- the only 2 styles of music that seem to do that these days
relax and calm my soul
Some pieces of contemporary pop music do do that but most don’t

Listening to CBC Radio 2 Commentary on the background and inspiration of the great Classical composers I now realize how much the influence of nature played a part in composing their music
The sound of waterfalls, the babblings of brooks, the meanderings of quiet streams, the flight of the bumblebee, the chirping of birds and the wings of the lark as it ascends
how these sounds they tried to recapture in their melodies

That explains why classical music is so beautiful
I never knew that about the classics until I heard this commentary
This also probably explains why I don’t listen to so much contemporary music these days
So much contemporary music expresses the anguish and torment of the human soul
That is I suppose why we listen
So many of us in anguish and torment ourselves
we can relate to the anguish and torment of the singer and the song
but while this listening gives us a sense of kinship and the feeling we’re not alone
Ultimately such listening does not bring healing
Only more anguish and torment
What we need is healing

And so that is why ultimately I find healing in most Classical music
The sound of waterfalls, the flowers opening their petals and saying hello to the sun, the reflections of moonlight doing their silent dances on the tranquil waters of a lake, the song of the nightingale
all transcribed into musical melody
by the great classical composers
Nature’s healing powers transferred to musical instruments and then on wings of notes and melody transfused into the human soul

-A poem written by Christopher
Monday July 11th 2016

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26 Comments

  1. ѕнєяяιє ∂є ναℓєяια said,

    I have all the collection of Classical music on the shelves. I still have those gramaphone records as well of which I played almost everyday in the house. I love even the rustic sound of the record playing and it is almost romantic and eerie at the same time, feels like as if you are transported back in the past when life are simple and just so.

    I hope for all the best for you, my dearest Chris.

    • Dracul Van Helsing said,

      Thanks very much, Sherrie. 🙂

      Yes, I loved listening to Classical music on those old Gramophone albums of which my mother and father had many.

      I wish all the best for you too, my dearest Sherrie.

  2. doesitevenmatter3 said,

    A beautiful ode to classical music!
    I love classical music (and I still listen to the old-fashioned radio late at night)…you described it beautifully!
    My oldest plays piano and keyboard magnificently…after he left home for college I missed the classical music he played for me.
    Now I’m think of Moonlight Sonata, Four Seasons, Ode to Joy, Nessun Dorma, Brahm’s Lullaby, etc.!

    And here is one of my favorites for you, Chris!

    (((HUGS)))

    • Dracul Van Helsing said,

      Thanks very much, Carolyn. 🙂

      That was beautiful.

      • doesitevenmatter3 said,

        You’re welcome, Christopher!

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        Debussy was one composer whose work I wasn’t too familiar with.

        But they play a great deal of his music on Tempo on CBC Radio 2 and Shift on CBC Radio 2 – the two classical music programs I now listen to.

        And I can see that he was truly a great composer.

        I’m glad I’m now more familiar with his work. 🙂

      • doesitevenmatter3 said,

        That’s cool!
        His music can make me cry. It’s so beautiful!

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        It’s very beautiful indeed. 🙂

    • Hyperion said,

      Thank you Carolyn. Claire de Lune is also one of my favorites and i enjoyed listening to the recording you posted.

  3. Natasha Pea said,

    That’s very true, good point. Associating with certain feelings doesn’t help to let go of them, only reinforces it stronger. I also like classic music.

    • Dracul Van Helsing said,

      Thanks for your comment, Natasha. 🙂

      Yes, for example I’ve learned to stop listening to sad songs when I’m sad.

      It took me a while but I finally learned. 😀

      • Natasha Pea said,

        I always listen to cheerful songs when I’m sad because they make me feel better, even if a little bit

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        Yes, cheerful songs are good that way. 🙂

  4. Hyperion said,

    Very nice declaration of the peace classical music brings to you. It just so happens I enjoy it as well. I have a great collection on CDs which I can play anywhere the mood strikes me. I uploaded copies to my iTunes playlist and can listen to classical music on my phone. Scientists have studied extensively the effects of music on the brain and soothing music to the listener has quantifiable benefits for the mental health outlook of the individual which in turn influences physical health. Turns out, we humans have been singing and making music from the beginning and it is clear the reason. Its natural positive effects are evident. However, the opposite is true of harsh music said to be any music that the listener is agitated by. That would be some of that caterwauling my Dragon Sisters do in the shower. 😀

    • Dracul Van Helsing said,

      Thanks, Daniel.

      I remember my mother (who studied to be a concert pianist) had quite an extensive collection of vinyl LPs of great classical music played by some of the great symphony orchestras of the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s.

      I wish I still had those.

      Yes back in my 20s, I used to listen to harsh angry music (Billy Idol for one).

      I remember my favourite music video was watching some purple haired heavy metal singer Dragon Sister dancing while wielding a whip in the jungles of Borneo.

      No just kidding although Sherrie informs me she used to do that (although I don’t know about the wielding the whip part).

      • Hyperion said,

        Oh man! that brings back memories. I do have some classic 45’s I saved but all my LP’s are gone gone gone. I would love to watch a music video of a purple haired Dragon Sister belting out the tunes to the crack of a whip. Tiger Mom sings like a canary. She will hit the karaoke in the store displays and draw huge crowds. They even try to give her money. I don’t know if it’s her beautiful voice or the red lipstick that does it.

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        They try to give her money eh?

        Maybe you should go around with a hat at these happenings and collect the money. 😀

      • Hyperion said,

        I wish i could but she does it on the spur of the moment and she doesn’t have a permit so if she takes the money she could get arrested for panhandling or worse. She was friends with three of the most popular female singers in Korea. I tried to get her to join them but she wouldn’t do it.

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        Who were those 3 singers?

        I’m familiar with Jeon Ji-hyun and Lee Hyori from over a decade ago.

        I guess there are probably several new contemporary girl bands these days.

      • Hyperion said,

        The singers were Jae Hee and, Insooni (stage names). They sang together until Insooni made a break out single. And, Bangshidee (also stage name) who my youngest is named for. Bangshidee was dearly loved and quite a big girl. She suffered a stroke that ended her career but not the devotion of her fans. That was before the glitzy K-Pop stormed the global music industry. They were considered ground breakers for the follow on female singers.

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        Yes, K-Pop is quite the glitzy phenomenon at the moment.

      • Hyperion said,

        The K-Pop factories know how to crank out entertainers that can sing, dance, show a highly evolved public decorum and handle the fanatic media and paparazzi. No wonder they have taken the world by storm. No other country invests in their entertainers as if they were Olympic champions representing the pride of the country.

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        They certainly put the rest of the world to shame.

        J-pop singers are pretty good too. 🙂

      • Hyperion said,

        I do like the creative entertainment of China, Korea, and Japan. The real power of their presentation is in the subtleness and emotions as well as the precise timing, symmetry, and coordination. It all equates to a sublime balance of the senses with one sense or emotion targeted at a time and the rest playing a supporting role. For instance, a song may have a very appealing melody but the visual presentation isn’t ignored either.

      • Dracul Van Helsing said,

        That’s very true.

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