Reflections On A Passing Phantom

January 12, 2017 at 12:33 pm (Detective story, Geopolitics and International Relations, History, Romance, Vampire novel) (, , , , , , , , )

Sherrielock Holmes sat at her chair in front of the mirror on her table and dresser.

She had just returned from a masquerade ball where she had dressed up as the Nymph of the Blue Moon.

The Nymph of the Blue Moon was a character she had read about in a movie review of a film written by a movie reviewer and film critic who couldn’t remember the name of the movie he was reviewing.

The movie the reviewer had seen on TCM (Turner Classic Movies).

It was a movie from the 1980s.

The plot of the movie was about a 1920s silent era film producer and movie director who was able to travel between past and future.

The past of course was the 1920s where he was busy writing a screenplay for a movie he intended to produce and direct.

The future was a hidden time (possibly 2017?) where he was pursued by government agents of some sinister world power (possibly the United States in the closing days of Obama and the beginning days of Trump).

His present was visiting a house on the moon where a beautiful woman with a beautiful singing voice lived.

But his present was usually always short lived and he spent more time in the past (writing his movie screenplay) or in the future (being pursued by government agents for knowing too much about world affairs).

Then one night- it was a blue moon- and when the moon was blue, his love came down to his past where he was receiving an Oscar for Best Screenplay at some Academy Awards evening in the Hollywood of the 1920s.

Reunited with his love for good, he remained in the past since he figured winning Oscars for Best Screenplay, Best Director and Best Picture was far preferable to the future where he was shot and killed by government agents for being a threat to humanity.

So she designed her own costume for what she imagined as the Nymph of the Blue Moon and wore it to the masquerade party. (The costume can be viewed at the bottom of this page:

https://draculvanhelsing.wordpress.com/2017/01/09/dracul-van-helsing-and-sherrielock-holmes-the-nymph-of-the-blue-moon-a-poem/ )

She entered the house’s White Room where she had posed for a photograph shot by an influential London banker (who was one of her most important clients of her London based dominatrix service).

As she was posing for the photo, a man dressed as the Phantom of The Opera Erik happened to enter the room.

When he saw a photo session was taking place, he turned around and left the room.

Sherrielock was totally haunted by the look of intense loneliness the man had had beneath his mask.

A loneliness that was only matched by the character of Erik the Phantom of the Opera whose costume he wore.

When he left the room, she followed him.

He left the house and the masquerade party and went back to his lonely solitary room in a London rooming house.

She stood outside the window where she heard the sound of an old phonograph being played.

It was playing an old Michael Jackson song sung by Michael Jackson when he was very young- just 14 years old.

Although Sherrielock did not realize it, the song Ben was actually the “Phantom’s” favourite Michael Jackson song.

For the song seemed to describe so well the life the “Phantom” had lived in the 6 and a half years since his father died.

She could hear the lyrics of the song through the window:

Ben, you’re always running here and there
You feel you’re not wanted anywhere…

Ben, most people would turn you away…

I’m sure they’d think again
If they had a friend like Ben…

Sherrielock turned from the house and walked down the street.

Where her tear drops mixed with the snow flakes in falling on to the pavement.

-A vampire novel chapter
written by Christopher
Tuesday January 10th
2017.

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2 Comments

  1. righteousbruin9 said,

    Glad you’re keeping on. I will have your 2013-Jan. 2014 posts saved, by Sunday evening. Let me know if you need any earlier posts saved as well.

  2. Dracul Van Helsing said,

    Thanks, Gary.

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