The Vicar of Morwenstow

July 8, 2020 at 10:51 pm (Detective story, Folklore, History, Poetry, The Supernatural, Vampire novel) (, , , , , , , )

Carson Cody Albion Private Eye
was walking through the Morwenstow parish district
of Cornwall in England
He had been hired by a wealthy American to track down traces of Arthurian lore

And that mission had brought him to this wild and desolate
but beautiful part of this “sceptered isle”
Here the Church of Saint Morwenna stood
A church built in the Norman period
to honour Saint Morwenna
a Welsh princess and Saint
who lived in the district

The most famous Vicar of Morwenstow
was Rev. Robert Stephen Hawker
The man who introduced the Harvest Festival to the Church of England
A commemoration that soon spread to all parts of the worldwide Anglican communion
Rev. Hawker was also the author of The Song of The Western Men
which is the unofficial anthem of the Duchy of Cornwall
with its stirring lines
“And shall Trelawny die?/ Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men/ Will know the reason why!/”

Rev. Hawker was a noted eccentric among his 19th Century rural Cornwall congregants
Known for wearing colourful bright colours
And the only traditional clerical black things he wore
were his socks
Rev. Hawker also built himself a small hut known as Hawker’s Hut
on the cliffs overlooking the Atlantic Ocean

Here it was said that he was visited by Saint Morwenna who spoke to him
Albion thought to himself that these visits would certainly be condemned by most Protestants as necromancy and spiritism
That she who claimed to be Saint Morwenna was actually a demon in disguise would be their argument

But such was not the view behind the term Communion of Saints an expression recited in both the Apostle’s and Nicene Creeds
For the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox and Anglo-Catholic Anglicans and Episcopalians believe that with Christ’s Death and Resurrection,
the veil between the worlds of the living and the dead
had been radically thinned
Whereas prior to Christ’s Death and Resurrection, there had indeed
been the spiritual equivalent of a brick wall between the living and the dead
Therefore condemnations of necromancy as in Deuteronomy Chapter 18
and Samuel’s spirit’s rebuke to King Saul
when Samuel himself was actually brought forth
from the realm of Sheol
much to the surprise of the Witch of Endor
were perfectly justified

To deliberately seek out the spirits of the dead
and try to consult them
was still necromancy and spiritism
but if God allowed the spirits of the departed
in paradise and Heaven
to visit mortals on Earth
nothing unholy is taking place
provided it’s done on God’s terms
and not through some occultic invocation
on the part of some mortal would-be recipient

The ironic thing is because most Protestants
particularly those of a Calvinistic disposition
did not have the consolation of the Communion of Saints
as noted in the Apostle’s and Nicene Creeds
some Protestants would actually go to spiritist
mediums and seances to find out if their loved ones are all right
Thereby breaking the Deuteronomy 18 prohibition against necromancy

It was at a seance at his Irish family castle in 1830
that John Nelson Darby the future founder of the Plymouth Brethren
was visited by a “ghost” who told him that Christian believers
would be raptured before the Great Tribulation
and they would escape many of the plagues, natural calamities and persecutions prophesied in the Book of Revelation

John Nelson Darby’s “seance ghostly” revelation of a pre-Tribulation rapture
would be made popular in a book published by Hal Lindsay 50 years ago in 1970
although it is doubtful that Lindsay was aware of the occultic necromantic origins of Darby’s pre-Trib rapture theory
Although whether Scofield the translator and author of the Scofield Reference Bible was unaware is another matter

Christ asked His Apostles the question that when He returned, would He find Faith on the Earth?
The answer being that He would probably not.
I guess if one is expecting to be raptured before all Hell breaks loose on the Earth (like Darby’s ghostly seance visitor promised Darby)
and it doesn’t happen like the (unholy) ghost of Darby’s seance promised
then one would lose faith in Christ (who never actually promised a pre-Tribulation rapure).

As for Saint Morwenna herself,
she was the daughter of a Welsh king Brychan Brycheiniog
She had crossed over to Cornwall
and made her home in a little hermitage at Hennacliff (the Raven’s Crag)
It stands near the top of a high cliff overlooking the Atlantic
where the sea is constantly stormy
and when it is not stormy, the coast of her native Wales can be seen.

Her father King Brychan knew the real historical King Arthur
Whether Saint Morwenna told Rev. Hawker about the real historical Arthur or not
Albion could only speculate
For Hawker did begin a poem about Arthur in 1864
called The Quest of The Sangraal
a poem he never finished

Albion went to a teashop near Morwenstow to meet his girlfriend
There to begin their own quest for the Sangraal

-A poem and vampire novel chapter
written by Christopher
Wednesday July 8th
The Feast Day of Saint Morwenna
2020.

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