Wilkie The Cat Plays Hamlet

August 20, 2019 at 10:40 pm (Comedy, Culture, Entertainment, Humour, Literature, Poetry, Romance, theatre, Theatre Arts) (, , , , )

Wilkie The Cat Plays Hamlet

The noted New York feline thespian Wilkie The Cat was on stage appearing in his own production of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

The vain cat actor was naturally playing the lead role.

“If it were done when ’tis done, 
then twere well it were done quickly…”

“You idiot, that’s from MacBeth,” shouted Mitzi the French cat who was playing Ophelia.

“Oh,” Wilkie took a look at what he had written on his cuff links.

“Sorry folks,” Wilkie grinned at the audience.

Wilkie struck a dramatic Sir John Barrymore style pose.

“I have come to bury Caesar not to praise him,” Wilkie began.

The body of a German shepherd is carried by four marching legionaries across the stage followed by a weeping female French poodle.

“That’s from Julius Caesar, bozo!” Mitzi exclaimed.

“Oops!” Wilkie took a look at what was written on the cuff links of his other front paw.

“Now is the winter of our discontent,” Wilkie began as imagery of hot dogs and ice cream cones and a summer beach and loads of bikini clad women and swimming suit men appear on the screen behind him.

“Richard III, idiot!” Mitzi shook her head.

An actor dressed like John Wayne appears on stage and in a John Wayne like voice says, “A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!”.

Wilkie sits down and takes a look at what was written on one of the white socks on his back paws, “O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou, Romeo?”.

“That’s Juliet’s line from Romeo and Juliet, you nincompoop!” Mitzi threw her paws in the air in exasperation.

Wilkie hearkens to what was written on the white sock on his other back paw.

“I fear my Thisbe’s promise is forgot!” Wilkie puts his right front paw to his feline brow in ultra melodramatic fashion.

“That’s from Pyramus and Thisbe the play within a play in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, you ninny!” Mitzi grabs her parasol umbrella from the stage hand off stage so she can hit Wilkie over the head with it.

Wilkie pulls off a piece of paper he has stapled to his tail.

“Those are the lines from King Lear you have there!” Mitzi approaches menacingly with her umbrella.

“King Leer!” Wilkie protests too much, “I’m no King Leer! You must think me a voyeur of some importance.”

The disgraced Pee-wee Herman walks across stage holding a pair of binoculars through which his eyes are peering.

Wilkie rips out a piece of paper that’s stapled to his tongue, reads it and cries out, “Soft you now, the fair Ophelia!”.

Mitzi casts her parasol to the stage and sighs, “Finally now, you’ve got the right play.”

At that point, Donald Trump with his toupee falling off, walks on stage and proclaims,

“In this same interlude it doth befall
That I, one Trump by name, present a wall…”

At that moment, the mostly Democratic Party aligned New York City audience rushes towards the stage to tear it apart (along with many in the audience who just want their money back).

As the New York City Mayor’s wife (a former lesbian) rushes on to the stage, Wilkie the Cat shouts, “Get thee to a nunnery!”.

Wilkie is then immediately attacked by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo who tries to inject the feline with saline solution and then suck him up with a Planned Parenthood approved Electrolux vacuum cleaner.

Needless to say like every other play Wilkie had produced and directed for Broadway, the cat’s adaptation of Hamlet did not have a second night’s performance.

-A Wilkie the Cat Short Story
written by Christopher 
Tuesday August 20th
2019.

Dolores Costello with her husband John Barrymore.
Barrymore, unlike Wilkie The Cat, could perform Shakespeare.

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Reblog of Orson Welles and The Unusual Production of MacBeth

March 31, 2019 at 9:11 pm (Entertainment, Horror, Literature, Movies, Plays, Vampire novel) (, , , , , , , , )

A vampire novel chapter and blog post I wrote 4 years ago today.

Dracul Van Helsing

Orson Welles and The Unusual Production of MacBeth

It was March 1945.

And talented director and actor of stage, radio and film the great Orson Welles was directing a short scene from William Shakespeare’s MacBeth for an upcoming charity event.

Welles (in front of the stage): All right. Enter the three witches.

(Thunder and lightning. Enter three witches)

First Witch (lowering “her” cowl to reveal the face of Adolf Hitler- a fact which startles Orson Welles):

When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning or in rain?

Second Witch (lowering her “cowl” to reveal the face of Josef Stalin- a fact which also startles Orson Welles):

When the hurlyburly’s done,
When the battle’s lost and won.

Third Witch (lowers its cowl to reveal a face wearing a mask. It speaks in a very metallic sounding voice):

That will be ere the set of sun.

(On the wall at the…

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Julius Caesar On The Ides of March: A Poem

March 15, 2017 at 4:23 pm (History, News, Poetry) (, , , , , , , )

Julius Caesar ventured out on the Ides of March
only to discover his toga was loaded with starch
Calpurnia had overdone herself
with premonitions off the shelf
from a soothsayer warning
to dreams before morning
The Ides of March for Caesar did not bare well
but Caesar told them all to go to Hell
or the equivalent Latin expression
but Cassius suffered not indigestion
with his lean and hungry look
from underneath toga a knife he took
and Brutus did deliver the final blow
Caesar’s toga was bloodied from head to toe
at the feet of Pompey’s statue Caesar fell
and his blood flowed like water from gushing well.

Great Caesar had fallen and could not get up
Blood and betrayal was in his final cup
it was a cup he was forced to drink
for from Ides of March he would not shrink
He had gone forth steadfast
to a moment to be his last

Sometimes it’s wise to listen to one’s wife
One could then live an extended life.

-A poem written by Christopher
March 15th 2017
The Ides of March

Calpurnia
Calpurnia warned her husband Julius not to go out on the Ides of March

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Donald Trump: The Shakespearian Tragi-Comedy

February 20, 2017 at 4:40 pm (Literature, News, Plays, Poetry) (, , , , )

Donald Trump (surveying the land); It is an ill wind that blows from yonder lying corrupt media…

(The wind coming through the oval office window blows the Donald’s hair off)

Trump (picking up his hair and looking at it): Alas! Poor Yorick! I knew him well, Horatio.

Mike Pence: The name is Michael, Mr. President.

Trump: Pence or Flynn?

Mike Pence: Pence.

Trump: That’s good. I thought I fired Flynn.

Mike Pence: He has suffered the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Mr. President.

Trump: Yes, but the fault lies not in the stars but in ourselves.

Mike Pence: Look on yonder screen. What evil potion has been thrown at Kim Jung-nam.

Trump: What a towel. What a poison. What a woman. Come, let me clutch thee.

(Trump picks a pussy cat up off the office floor)

Mike Pence: Many a tragedy has befallen the nation of Malaysia these past 3 years.

Trump: Such ill fortune has fallen on that country. Just as good fortune and fair sun now shine on ours. Still, when in Malaysia, do as the North Koreans do.

Mike Pence: Do you still intend to build the wall, Mr. President?

Trump: I do. Even now through this very door comes a man to talk about the wall.

Snout (from A Midsummer Night’s Dream enters Oval Office and bows) :

In this same interlude it doth befall
that I one Snout by name present a wall
and such a wall as I would have you think
that had in it a crannied hole or chink
Through which the lovers Pyramus and Thisbe
Did whisper often very secretly…

Trump: Get out, fool.

(Snout flees Oval Office as does Trump’s reflection from the mirror)

Trump: Oh wherefore art thou, John Wayne?
A horse. A horse. My kingdom for a horse.

(A Dalmatian dog enters the room, lifts his leg and pees on the Donald)

Trump: Out, out, damned Spot.

(Curtain falls on an Oval Office in chaos or so say the Fake News media)

-A neo-Shakespearian tale
written by Christopher
Monday February 20th
2017.

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Haiku About Saint Crispin’s and Saint Crispinian’s Day and The Battle of Agincourt

October 25, 2016 at 2:56 pm (Literature, Plays, Poetry) (, , , , , , , , )

Haiku About Saint Crispin’s and Saint Crispinian’s Day and The Battle of Agincourt

Henry V led them
Inspires with stirring speech
this blest happy few

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Haiku On The 400th Anniversary of Shakespeare’s Death

April 23, 2016 at 7:38 pm (Commentary, Culture, Entertainment, History, Inspiration, Literature, News, Plays, Poetry) (, , , , )

Haiku On The 400th Anniversary of Shakespeare’s Death

Save in this man’s case
the good he did still lives on
not interred with bones

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600th Anniversary of Battle of Agincourt

October 25, 2015 at 6:50 pm (Commentary, Geopolitics and International Relations, History, Humour, Literature, Plays, Quotations and Sayings of Dracul Van Helsing) (, , , , , , , )

600th Anniversary of Battle of Agincourt

It was 600 years ago today- October 25th 1415- St. Crispin’s Day- that England’s King Henry V delivered a speech written for him by the yet-to-be- born future playwright William Shakespeare and then went on to defeat French forces at the Battle of Agincourt.

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Orson Welles and The Unusual Production of MacBeth

March 31, 2015 at 5:36 pm (Entertainment, Horror, Literature, Movies, Plays, Vampire novel) (, , , , , , , )

Orson Welles and The Unusual Production of MacBeth

It was March 1945.

And talented director and actor of stage, radio and film the great Orson Welles was directing a short scene from William Shakespeare’s MacBeth for an upcoming charity event.

Welles (in front of the stage): All right. Enter the three witches.

(Thunder and lightning. Enter three witches)

First Witch (lowering “her” cowl to reveal the face of Adolf Hitler- a fact which startles Orson Welles):

When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning or in rain?

Second Witch (lowering her “cowl” to reveal the face of Josef Stalin- a fact which also startles Orson Welles):

When the hurlyburly’s done,
When the battle’s lost and won.

Third Witch (lowers its cowl to reveal a face wearing a mask. It speaks in a very metallic sounding voice):

That will be ere the set of sun.

(On the wall at the back of the stage are flashed images of a solar eclipse followed by a blood red moon)

First Witch (Hitler): Where the place?

Second Witch (Stalin): Upon the heath.

(A strange multicoloured spiral image is then projected on to the screen behind the stage. Orson Welles does not recognize the image on this day in March 1945 but later generations would have recognized the spiral as the double helix of DNA)

Third Witch (with mask and metallic sounding voice): There to meet with MacBeth.

(The image of a face is then projected on to the screen behind the stage)

Orson Welles (waking up in bed with a start): Great heavens!

Rita Hayworth (next to him): What is it?

Orson Welles: I just had the most terrifying dream.

Rita Hayworth: What was it?

Orson Welles (scratching his head): I can’t remember… it’s receding from my memory… but…

Rita Hayworth: But what?

Orson Welles: I have seen the future… and it’s a nightmare.

-A vampire novel chapter
written by Christopher
Tuesday March 31st
2015.

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Renfield and Andy Warhol’s Prophetic Paintings

March 1, 2015 at 6:46 pm (Commentary, News, Satire, Vampire novel) (, , , , , , , , )

Renfield and Andy Warhol’s Prophetic Paintings

Renfield R. Renfield and Amadeus Emanon were attending a special exhibit on Prophetic Works of Art at the Cirillo Gallery in London.
The first item they glanced at was what turned out to be a prophetic painting by Andy Warhol entitled Phoenix Llamas’ 15 Minutes of Fame that showed two llamas running amok through the streets of Phoenix, Arizona.

The next painting was also prophetic and was also by Andy Warhol- it was called Portrait of A San Francisco Transgendered Llama Wearing A Dress Whose Color Is The Subject of An Intense Debate.

The painting showed a llama wearing a dress whose colour changed depending upon what direction you gazed on it.

From one direction, the dress appeared blue and black.

From another direction, it appeared gold and white.

The third item was a single line on a piece of paper from a lost manuscript of a long lost and virtually forgotten William Shakespeare play that the Bard penned in 1615 entitled Vision of The World Four Centuries Hence.

The single line read,

#TheDress ‘Tis a tweet retweeted by idiots full of sound and fury signifying nothing.

To be continued.

-A vampire novel chapter
written by Christopher
Sunday March 1st
2015.

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Haiku About Hamlet’s Father’s Ghost

January 5, 2015 at 8:28 pm (Humour, Literature, Poetry) (, , , , , , , , , , )

Haiku About Hamlet’s Father’s Ghost

-written by Christopher
Monday January 5th
2015.

Hamlet’s father’s ghost
seeks Cinnamon Danish bun
atop Elsinore

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