Stan Was The Man: A Poem Introduced By Alfred Hitchcock

January 15, 2016 at 8:38 pm (Entertainment, Movies, Poetry, Television, TV Shows, Vampire novel) (, , , , )

Stan Was The Man: A Poem Introduced By Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock: Good evening, I’m Alfred Hitchcock and welcome to Alfred Hitchcock Presents. I’ll start out by saying that rumours of my death have not been greatly exaggerated. I’ve been dead now for almost 36 years. But as the old saying goes, you can’t keep a good man down.
So by popular demand, my ghost has returned to bring you an encore presentation of my popular television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents for this year of 2016.
As you know I was the host of an extremely successful television series that ran on two different networks CBS and NBC over the course of a decade back in the late ’50s and early ’60s.
Those were the days when television studios relied on good plots and captivating dialogue to grip and enthrall their audiences.
Today of course they rely on gratuitous sex and excessive violence and close-up shots of derrières of air headed celebrities in an effort to keep their ratings high.
Some producer recently suggested that maybe they should try producing one television show this year that actually relied on that extremely old fashioned formula of good plots and captivating dialogue.
The producer immediately found himself pushed through the window of the board room from the high floor of the building he was in.
So regretably he won’t be around to see his proposal come to fruition.
I myself just happened to be in the neighbourhood at the time appearing as a special guest on a Haunted Hollywood tour.
So they asked me to line up a program in the late lamented producer’s memory.
So tonight, I am pleased to present a television episode that’s in the form of a poem.
The poem is entitled Stan Was The Man.

Stan Was The Man: A Poem

Stan was the man
The man with the plan
The plan was to steal the Crown Jewels
and make Scotland Yard look like fools
Into the Tower of London he went
claiming to be the Duke of Kent
he helped himself to the Crown Jewels
and left behind miniature toy mules
Into the getaway car he hopped
and not once was the fleeing vehicle stopped
On streets and roads and sidewalks it went
carrying the pseudo-Duke of Kent
to pursuing police cars it would not yield
even denting the car of Renfield R. Renfield
That was their fatal mistake
one they’d regret to Eternity’s gate
Renfield followed in hot pursuit
who he ran over, he didn’t give a hoot
Cameron would end up replacing half his cabinet
after they wound up on London streets like scrambled eggs and squashed rabbit
Renfield caught up with the robbers three
after they crashed into a bakery
He pulled out his gun
while ordering a bun
and shot the trio dead
while helping himself to jam so red
He then ate the bun
and said, I have to run
and off he drove
this son of a gun.

Alfred Hitchcock: And so ends tonight’s episode told in the form of a poem.
Stan discovered too late that the best laid plans of mice and men often go astray.
The Crown Jewels were returned to the Tower of London, Stan and his compatriots paid an impromptu visit to the London Morgue and Renfield discovered a great new place to buy cinnamon buns.
As that most illustrious of playwrights Mr. William Shakespeare once said, “All’s well that ends well.”
And so with that in mind, I bid you adieu and good night ladies and gentlemen.

-A poem, episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents and
vampire novel chapter
written by Christopher
Friday January 15th
2016.

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